Yosemite: Glacier Point and Tunnel View

After stopping at Washburn Point, I headed down the switchbacks to the end of the road–Glacier Point.

Stepping out of the car, it lived up to its name, as the shaded areas were quite chilly, even in the early afternoon, and it only got slightly warmer in the sunlight.

Yet, the drive up to the Point was worth it; there was another impressive view of Half Dome, this time showing more of its flat face that is famous for the rock climbing. While I was up there, people with high powered binoculars could see hikers on the top of the Dome, on the other side of the Valley from us.

As I have said before, being on the top of the mountain conveys a whole different sense of the size of Yosemite, and impresses upon you how tiny and fragile you really are as a human being (although, in fairness, the whole park reminds me of this).

On the way back down the road, I stopped at Tunnel View. Arguably the most famous view in all of Yosemite (it is a Mac background image for OS X Yosemite), this was my first time stopping there to take pictures.

While there, I hiked along the trail that starts in the parking lot and ascends to Artist’s Point (and beyond). I think. While the directions I found online are specific-ish (if you cross the Creek, you’ve gone too far), there are no trail markers or sign posts to mark whether you are at the point or only nearby.

Either way, it provides a perspective different from Tunnel View, and is worth attempting.

I hope you enjoy!

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